New Dining Practice Standards endorsed by CMS call for nursing homes to offer person-centered diets aligned with resident preferences. Using the Preferences for Everyday Living Inventory (PELI), this study asked 255 residents in 28 nursing homes about barriers to fulfilling food preferences. Participants cited facility policies, restrictive schedules, and perceptions of poor food quality (thought to be caused by lack of staff proficiency). Personal health and finances also were barriers. Health status, desirability of dining companions, and availability of nursing home resources likely prompted some residents to adjust food preferences based on their situations. The study highlights strategies to learn about resident preferences and identifies obstacles to more person-centered dining practices.

Publication available online, subscription may be required.

http://doi.org/10.1080/21551197.2019.1617220

Funder(s)

NINR grant (R21NR011334: PI Van Haitsma)

Citation

Goldstein, C., Abbott, K., Bangerter, L., Kotterman, A., & VanHaitsma, K. (2019). “A Bone of Contention…”: Perceived Barriers and Situational Dependencies to Food Preferences of Nursing Home Residents. Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics. doi.org/10.1080/21551197.2019.1617220

Team Members as Authors

Members of the the PELI Team who contributed to this publication.

Katherine Abbott, Ph.D, MGS

Avatar for Dennis Cheatham

Dennis Cheatham

Communication Director

Robert H. and Nancy J. Blayney Professor, Scripps Research Fellow

Associate Professor, Department of Sociology & Gerontology

Katherine Abbott, Ph.D, MGS

Kimberly VanHaitsma, Ph.D.

Avatar for Dennis Cheatham

Dennis Cheatham

Communication Director

Director, Program for Person-Centered Living Systems of Care

Associate Professor of Nursing, College of Nursing

Kimberly VanHaitsma, Ph.D.